Document Type

Article

Department

General Surgery

Abstract

Introduction Factors associated with complicated appendicitis have been inconsistently identified. Moreover, studies are lacking from low and low-middle countries where access to surgical care is limited. Our objective was to identify factors predicting complicated appendicitis as diagnosed intraoperatively in a low-middle income country hospital. Methodology Retrospective case-control study of patients who underwent laparoscopic appendectomy from 01/2008 to 12/2015 was completed. Based on intraoperative diagnosis of complicated appendicitis, patients were divided into two groups; those with complicated appendicitis (CA) and those who had non-complicated appendicitis (NCA). CT scans were further reviewed to identify presence of appendicolith. Result Of the 442 patients included, 88 (20%) patients were in the CA group while 354 (80%) patients were in the NCA group. Patients in the CA group were older [CA vs. NCA: 34.6 ± 14 vs. 30.4 ± 11.5; p-value < 0.001], had symptoms for longer duration [CA vs. NCA: 2 ± 1.2 vs. 1.5 ± 0.8; p-value: 0.001] and had a greater proportion of patients with appendicoliths [CA vs. NCA: 37 (42%) vs. 84 (23.7%); p-value: 0.001]. On multivariable regression analysis, patients with complicated appendicitis had greater odds of having appendicoliths (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.4-4.07; p-value < 0.001) and symptoms for a longer duration (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.25-1.97; p-value < 0.001). Conclusion Patients with complicated appendicitis had greater odds of having appendicoliths and symptoms for a longer duration. Further studies are warranted in low and low-middle income countries to gauge the impact delay in presentation and intervention has on appendicitis and its outcomes.

Publication

Cureus

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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