Title

Satisfaction and self-confidence of undergraduate nursing students having simulation-based learning experiences in a private university Karachi, Pakistan

Date of Award

2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Nursing (MScN)

Department

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Pakistan

Abstract

Simulation-based learning is an appreciated methodology for preparing nursing students for future clinical encounters. Hands-on patient care is best experienced through clinical rotations; however, opportunities of direct patient care for student nurses are limited due to lack of clinical sites and availability of patients, faculty shortages, and some ethical and safety concerns. In this situation, simulation-based clinical education is considered as one of the best instructional modalities for nursing students to practice their clinical skills, without compromising patients' well-being. The satisfaction of the nursing students with their learning experience has a significant impact on their academic performance. When the students are actively involved in their learning, they usually enjoy the course work and, at the end, they feel satisfied. This satisfaction might increase the students' interest, which is necessary for gaining knowledge and skills, and in building their confidence, regarding the skills they learned through simulation-based learning. Purpose: This study aimed to measure the satisfaction and self-confidence of undergraduate nursing students having simulation-based learning experiences. Correspondingly, the study aimed to assess the correlation between satisfaction and self-confidence. Methodology: A quantitative, descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to conduct this study. A total of n= 230 undergraduate nursing students were recruited using total population sampling. The Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale (SSES) was used to collect data regarding satisfaction. The sub-scale (b) of the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Scale (SSS) was used to measure the self-confidence of the undergraduate nursing students having simulation-based learning experiences. Results: Findings revealed a significant difference in mean scores of satisfaction and selfconfidence among the three study groups, p < 0.05. The fourth-year BScN participants were statistically significantly different, p = 0.001, in satisfaction, from the third year BScN participants, but not from second year post-RN BScN participants p = 0.06. The fourth-year BScN participants were different in self-confidence from both the third-year BScN and the second-year post-RN BScN participants, but this difference was not statistically significant. A strong positive correlation, Pearson r = 0.725, p = 0.001, was revealed between the satisfaction and self-confidence of undergraduate nursing students having simulation-based learning experiences. Conclusion: The study discovered that nursing students having simulation-based learning experiences were satisfied and confident. The differences in the mean scores of satisfaction and selfconfidence could be due to different reasons such as courses taught by different facilitators, level of the study participants, opportunities for repeated simulation experiences, etc., that need to be explored in detail, through further researches. Hence, it can be concluded that simulation-based learning experiences play a significant role in increasing satisfaction and in building the selfconfidence of nursing students, so it should be made a part of the curriculum and integrated into all possible courses in the undergraduate nursing programmes.

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