Authors

Ann Monima Lemuel, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Ibe Michael Usman, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Keneth Iceland Kasozi, The University of Edinburgh, UK
Saad Alghamdi, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
Eric Osamudiamwen Aigbogun, Cavendish University, Kampala, Uganda,
Victor Archibong, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Robinson Ssebuufu, Uganda Medical and Dental Practitioners’ Council, Kampala, Uganda
Annet Kabanyoro, Aga Khan UniversityFollow
Josiah Eseoghene Ifie, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Dominic Terkimbi Swase, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Fred Ssempijja, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
John Tabakwot Ayuba, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Kevin Matama, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Hope Onohuean, Kampala International University, Kampala, Uganda
Stellamaris Kembabazi, Kampala International University Western Campus, Uganda
Rachael Henry, Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria
Said Odoma, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria
Helen Yusuf, Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria
Adam Moyosore Afodun, Busitema University, Tororo, Uganda
Hamza M. Assaggaf, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
Emmanuel Kairania, Busitema University, Tororo, Uganda
Akhmed Aslam, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
Owoisinke Okon, University of Calabar, Nigeria
Gaber El-Saber Batiha, Damanhour University, Egypt
Susan Christina Welburn, Zhejiang University, Haining, China

Document Type

Article

Department

School of Nursing and Midwifery, East Africa

Abstract

Objective: The study aimed to investigate the relationship between mental health with the level of education, relationship status, and awareness on mental health among low-income earners in Western Uganda.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out among 253 participants. Anxiety, anger, and depression were assessed using a modified generalized anxiety disorder (GAD-7), Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, and Beck Depression Inventory item tools, respectively.

Results: The majority of our respondents were male (n = 150/253, 59.3), had a secondary level of education (104/253, 41.1), and were single (137/253, 54.2). No formal education and primary education (r2 = 47.4% and 6.4%, respectively) had a negative correlation with awareness of mental health care. In addition, no formal education had a positive correlation with anger and depression (r2 = 1.9% and 0.3%, respectively). Singleness in this study had a negative correlation with awareness of mental health care, anger, and depression (r2 = 1.9, 0.8, and 0.3%, respectively), and a positive correlation with anxiety (r2 = 3.9%).

Conclusion: It is evident that education and relationship status influenced awareness on mental health care and mental health state among low-income earners in Western Uganda during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Therefore, policymakers should strengthen social transformation through the proper engagement of low-income earners in this COVID-19 era.

Comments

This work was published before the author joined Aga Khan University.

Publication

Frontiers in Public Health

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