Title

Hip fracture surgery: does type of anesthesia matter?

Document Type

Article

Department

Orthopaedic Surgery

Abstract

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

A prevailing perception regarding night time surgery is that the probability of complications may be higher due to decreased availability of support staff, surgeon fatigue and other logistical factors. However there is little data supporting this notion in hip fracture surgery and we studied this in the context of Inter-trochanteric fractures fixed with dynamic hip screws (DHS).

METHODS:

All patients who underwent DHS fixation for inter-trochanteric fracture from January 2005 to December 2010 were included. Patients were divided into two groups. An after-hours group was defined as an operation done between 5:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M. and a daytime group was defined as surgery done between 7:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 19.

RESULTS:

During this period 194 patients underwent DHS fixation. One hundred and fourteen patients were included in the daytime group and 80 patients in the after-hours group. There was no difference in the rates of wound infection, length of hospital stay, postoperative ambulation status, intra op blood loss, type of anesthesia, and mortality between the two groups. Tip apex index was found to be similar between the two groups. Two patients in the daytime surgery required revision surgery compared to 5 patients in the after-hours group, however this difference was not statistically significant.

DISCUSSION:

Outcomes in terms of adequacy of fixation, post-operative complications and post-operative 30-day mortality are comparable to routine day time surgery while offering the benefits of early fixation and mobilization to the patient. This also has a positive impact on the financial burden on this population as early fixation translates into decreased length of stay and reduced cost of treatment.

Publication

Int J Surg