Title

Predicting outcomes of decompressive craniectomy: use of rotterdam computed tomography classification and marshall classification

Document Type

Article

Department

Surgery

Abstract

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Data on the evaluation of the Rotterdam Computed Tomography Classification (RCTS) as a predictor of outcomes in patients undergoing decompressive craniectomy (DC) for trauma is limited and lacks clarity.

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the role of RCTS in predicting unfavourable outcomes, including mortality in patients undergoing DC for head trauma.

METHODS:

This was an observational cohort study conducted from 1 January 2009 to 31 March 2013. CT scans of adults with head trauma prior to emergency DC were scored according to RCTS. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to identify the optimal cut-off RCTS for predicting unfavourable outcomes [Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) = 1-3]. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between RCTS and unfavourable outcomes including mortality.

RESULTS:

One hundred ninety-seven patients (mean age: 31.4 ± 18.7 years) were included in the study. Mean Glasgow coma score at presentation was 8.1 ± 3.6. RCTS was negatively correlated with GOS (r = -0.370; p < 0.001). The area under the curve was 0.687 (95% CI: 0.595-0.779; p < 0.001) and 0.666 (95% CI: 0.589-0.742; p < 0.001) for mortality and unfavourable outcomes, respectively. RCTS independently predicted both mortality (adjusted odds ratio for RCTS >3 compared with RCTS ≤3: 2.792, 95% CI: 1.235-6.311) and other unfavourable outcomes (adjusted odds ratio for RCTS >3 compared with RCTS ≤3: 2.063, 95% CI: 1.056-4.031).

CONCLUSION:

RCTS is an independent predictor of unfavourable outcomes and mortality among patients undergoing emergency DC.

Publication

British journal of neurosurgery