Title

Helicobacter pylori infection in children: population-based age-specific prevalence and risk factors in a developing country.

Document Type

Article

Department

Medicine; Gastroenterology

Abstract

Aim: 

We estimated the prevalence, age of acquisition and risk factors for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) seroprevalence in children aged 1–15 years.

Methods: 

Exposure was assessed using ELISA. Parents responded to a questionnaire regarding number of individuals sharing house, rooms, water source, latrines, housing and assessment of socioeconomic status (SES) by Hollingshead Index.

Results: 

Serum of 1976 children was tested. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in children aged 11–15 years was 53.5% (OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.58–2.5). It increased with moderate crowding index (CRI) of 2–4 to 45.9% (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 0.92–1.63) and to 51.2% with CRI >4 (OR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.12–2.06). In middle SES, seropositivity was 50.5% (331/655) (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.29–2.35), whereas in lower SES, it was 47.1% (500/1062) (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1–2.0). Multivariate analysis showed that Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence was high in children aged 6–10 and 11–15 years (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2–1.9 and OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.56–2.47 respectively), in lower-middle SES (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2–2.1 and OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.10–2.0 respectively) and in uneducated fathers (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.27–1.95).

Conclusion: 

Helicobacter pylori seropositivity increases with age, in low-middle SES and is related to father’s educational status. Reducing H. pylori seroprevalence will require improvement in sanitary conditions and educational status of the population.

Publication

Aca Paediatrica