Title

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcome and its predictors among hospitalized adult patients in Pakistan.

Document Type

Article

Department

Emergency Medicine

Abstract

Introduction:Our aim was to study the outcomes and predictors of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among adult Patients at a tertiary care centre in Pakistan.

Methods:

We conducted a retrospective chart review of all adult Patients (age > or =14 years), who underwent CPR following cardiac arrest, in a tertiary care hospital during a 5-year study period (June 1998 to June 2003). We excluded Patients aged 14 years or less, those who were declared dead on arrival and Patients with a "do not resuscitate" order. The 1- and 6-month follow-ups of discharged Patients were also recorded.

Results:

We found 383 cases of adult in-hospital cardiac arrest that underwent CPR. Pulseless electrical activity was the most common initial rhythm (50%), followed by asystole (30%) and ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (19%). Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 72% of Patients with 42% surviving more than 24 h, and 19% survived to discharge from hospital. On follow-up, 14% and 12% were found to be alive at 1 and 6 months, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression identified three independent predictors of better outcome (survival >24 h): non-intubated status [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 3.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-6.0], location of cardiac arrest in emergency department (aOR: 18.9, 95% CI: 7.0-51.0) and shorter duration of CPR (aOR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.9-5.5).

Conclusion:

Outcome of CPR following in-hospital cardiac arrest in our setting is better than described in other series. Non-intubated status before arrest, cardiac arrest in the emergency department and shorter duration of CPR were independent predictors of good outcome.

Publication

International Journal of Emergency Medicine