Event Title

New insights for healthcare professionals for detecting oral cancer: an epidemiological approach

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Background & Objectives: Warnakulasuriya (2010) reported that oral cancer is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Bhurgri (2005) stated an increase in the age standardized incidence rates (ASIR) per 100,000 in Pakistani males from 9.1 to 15.3 and in females from 9.3 to 12.3 in a period of 8 years from 1995-2002. Purpose: To explore the magnitude, causation and early detection of oral cancer and correlate it with contemporary literature.

Methods: Systemic review of literature from 28 research articles from 1999 to 2013 was conducted through electronic medium by using JPMA, SAGE and Google search engines. Furthermore, data from AKUH was also collected.

Results: In the Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi, Pakistan, since 2000 till date, 4,039 cases of oral cancers have been diagnosed. With 108 males and 37 females under 18 years of age, 26 males and 52 females at 35 years of age and 2,549 males and 857 females above 35 years of age. Literature supports that the possible risk factors include smoking tobacco, alcohol consumption, betel quid and areca nut chewing with or without tobacco, viruses, diet and deficiency states, and exposure to sunlight (Tanaka et al., 2011). In two studies conducted in Pakistan, and India and Srilanka, the relative risks for smoking were found to be 5.7 and 2.1 for men, and 12.9 and 11.5 for women, respectively (S. Carnelio et al., 2004). Conclusion: Screening should be an ongoing method and not a once-in-a-while project. Warnakulasuriya (2010) suggested that screening for recurrences or second primary tumors is pivotal in the foremost five years preceding treatment. Most recently, the World Health Assembly (WHA) passed a resolution on oral health for the first time in 25 years (Petersen, 2009). This accentuates the requirement for framing policies and strategies for oral health in the 21st century, along with the objective prevention and control of oral cancer.

Keywords: Oral cancer, smoking, screening, Healthcare professionals

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Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

New insights for healthcare professionals for detecting oral cancer: an epidemiological approach

Auditorium Pond Side

Background & Objectives: Warnakulasuriya (2010) reported that oral cancer is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Bhurgri (2005) stated an increase in the age standardized incidence rates (ASIR) per 100,000 in Pakistani males from 9.1 to 15.3 and in females from 9.3 to 12.3 in a period of 8 years from 1995-2002. Purpose: To explore the magnitude, causation and early detection of oral cancer and correlate it with contemporary literature.

Methods: Systemic review of literature from 28 research articles from 1999 to 2013 was conducted through electronic medium by using JPMA, SAGE and Google search engines. Furthermore, data from AKUH was also collected.

Results: In the Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi, Pakistan, since 2000 till date, 4,039 cases of oral cancers have been diagnosed. With 108 males and 37 females under 18 years of age, 26 males and 52 females at 35 years of age and 2,549 males and 857 females above 35 years of age. Literature supports that the possible risk factors include smoking tobacco, alcohol consumption, betel quid and areca nut chewing with or without tobacco, viruses, diet and deficiency states, and exposure to sunlight (Tanaka et al., 2011). In two studies conducted in Pakistan, and India and Srilanka, the relative risks for smoking were found to be 5.7 and 2.1 for men, and 12.9 and 11.5 for women, respectively (S. Carnelio et al., 2004). Conclusion: Screening should be an ongoing method and not a once-in-a-while project. Warnakulasuriya (2010) suggested that screening for recurrences or second primary tumors is pivotal in the foremost five years preceding treatment. Most recently, the World Health Assembly (WHA) passed a resolution on oral health for the first time in 25 years (Petersen, 2009). This accentuates the requirement for framing policies and strategies for oral health in the 21st century, along with the objective prevention and control of oral cancer.

Keywords: Oral cancer, smoking, screening, Healthcare professionals