Event Title

Multiple sclerosis in Pakistan; histocompatibility antigen (HLA) composition and disability

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Background and Objectives: An association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and histocompatibility antigen (HLA) is well known. This study was conducted to identify prevalence of various haplotypes among our MS patients as compared to control population. We also evaluated a possible correlation between haplotypes and disease severity (EDSS).

Methods: Patients with confirmed MS were prospectively enrolled from nine centers in Pakistan from January 2009 to September 2010. HLA alleles were identified using polymerase chain reaction and sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP). Control group comprised of a total of 1000 individuals, representing all major ethnic groups in Pakistan, tested for the distribution of HLA class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles.

Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in study (Male; 40%). Age range was 16-62 years (Mean 32 years). Out of these 23 patients (23%) developed severe disability (EDSS 6 or more) within five years of symptoms onset. Most important factors associated with this progression included primary or secondary progressive course and spinal cord involvement. Almost 50% patients in severe disability group had primary or secondary progressive course while 70% patients in this group had spinal cord involvement. Higher disability had a significant correlation with primary and secondary progressive type of MS (P=0.001) and spinal cord involvement (P=0.03).HLA typing and haplotype analysis of MS patients were compared with controls. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups. There was a statistically significant association between high disability and DQB1*0203 haplotype (P=0.04). The association between High disability and DRB1Alleles was non-significant.

Conclusion: 23 patients (23%) developed severe disability within five years of symptoms onset. Higher disability had a significant correlation with primary and secondary progressive type of MS (P=0.001) and spinal cord involvement (P=0.03). There was a statistically significant association between high disability (EDSS 6 or more) and DQB1*0203 haplotype (P=0.04).

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

Multiple sclerosis in Pakistan; histocompatibility antigen (HLA) composition and disability

Auditorium Pond Side

Background and Objectives: An association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and histocompatibility antigen (HLA) is well known. This study was conducted to identify prevalence of various haplotypes among our MS patients as compared to control population. We also evaluated a possible correlation between haplotypes and disease severity (EDSS).

Methods: Patients with confirmed MS were prospectively enrolled from nine centers in Pakistan from January 2009 to September 2010. HLA alleles were identified using polymerase chain reaction and sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP). Control group comprised of a total of 1000 individuals, representing all major ethnic groups in Pakistan, tested for the distribution of HLA class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles.

Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in study (Male; 40%). Age range was 16-62 years (Mean 32 years). Out of these 23 patients (23%) developed severe disability (EDSS 6 or more) within five years of symptoms onset. Most important factors associated with this progression included primary or secondary progressive course and spinal cord involvement. Almost 50% patients in severe disability group had primary or secondary progressive course while 70% patients in this group had spinal cord involvement. Higher disability had a significant correlation with primary and secondary progressive type of MS (P=0.001) and spinal cord involvement (P=0.03).HLA typing and haplotype analysis of MS patients were compared with controls. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups. There was a statistically significant association between high disability and DQB1*0203 haplotype (P=0.04). The association between High disability and DRB1Alleles was non-significant.

Conclusion: 23 patients (23%) developed severe disability within five years of symptoms onset. Higher disability had a significant correlation with primary and secondary progressive type of MS (P=0.001) and spinal cord involvement (P=0.03). There was a statistically significant association between high disability (EDSS 6 or more) and DQB1*0203 haplotype (P=0.04).