Event Title

Getting into the haart of matter: HIV protease inhibitors and onset of cardiovascular diseases

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Background & Objectives: Cardiovascular diseases have been an emerging area of concern in the HIV population. The successful roll-out of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has extended life expectancy and enhanced the overall well-being of HIV-positive individuals (Reyskens et al., 2014). There are, however, augmented concerns regarding HAART-mediated metabolic derangements and its potential risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the long run.

Methods: Systemic review of literature from 11 research articles from 2000 to 2014 was conducted through electronic medium by using JPMA, SAGE and Google search engines. Results: Despite successful antiviral therapy, numerous studies suggest a role of chronic inflammation, together with immune activation, that could lead to vascular dysfunction and atherothrombosis. It is now high time for physicians to prevent coronary heart disease in this high-risk population through the use of tools employed in the general population. Moreover, the lower median age at which acute coronary syndromes occur in HIV-infected patients should shift prevention to include patients 45 years of age (Boccara et al., 2013). Available cardiovascular risk scores in the general population usually fail to screen young patients at risk for myocardial infarction. Moreover, the novel vascular risk factors identified in HIV-related atherosclerosis, such as chronic inflammation are not taken into account in the available risk scores, leading to underestimation of cardiovascular risk in the HIV population.

Conclusion: Thus while HIV Protease Inhibitors substantially improve life expectancy and quality of life in HIV-positive patients, however, greater clinical awareness regarding its benefit–harm paradigm, and the development and evaluation of novel co-treatment strategies should be explored. Healthcare professionals require new tools to assess this higher risk and studies to determine whether intensive primary prevention is warranted.

Keywords: HAART, Primary Prevention, Cardiovascular Diseases, HIV Protease Inhibitors

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Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

Getting into the haart of matter: HIV protease inhibitors and onset of cardiovascular diseases

Auditorium Pond Side

Background & Objectives: Cardiovascular diseases have been an emerging area of concern in the HIV population. The successful roll-out of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has extended life expectancy and enhanced the overall well-being of HIV-positive individuals (Reyskens et al., 2014). There are, however, augmented concerns regarding HAART-mediated metabolic derangements and its potential risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the long run.

Methods: Systemic review of literature from 11 research articles from 2000 to 2014 was conducted through electronic medium by using JPMA, SAGE and Google search engines. Results: Despite successful antiviral therapy, numerous studies suggest a role of chronic inflammation, together with immune activation, that could lead to vascular dysfunction and atherothrombosis. It is now high time for physicians to prevent coronary heart disease in this high-risk population through the use of tools employed in the general population. Moreover, the lower median age at which acute coronary syndromes occur in HIV-infected patients should shift prevention to include patients 45 years of age (Boccara et al., 2013). Available cardiovascular risk scores in the general population usually fail to screen young patients at risk for myocardial infarction. Moreover, the novel vascular risk factors identified in HIV-related atherosclerosis, such as chronic inflammation are not taken into account in the available risk scores, leading to underestimation of cardiovascular risk in the HIV population.

Conclusion: Thus while HIV Protease Inhibitors substantially improve life expectancy and quality of life in HIV-positive patients, however, greater clinical awareness regarding its benefit–harm paradigm, and the development and evaluation of novel co-treatment strategies should be explored. Healthcare professionals require new tools to assess this higher risk and studies to determine whether intensive primary prevention is warranted.

Keywords: HAART, Primary Prevention, Cardiovascular Diseases, HIV Protease Inhibitors