Event Title

A pilot project to analyze the application of nightingale’s theory in declining depression in elders

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

It is anticipated that humans are increasing their life expectancy many fold that would result in amplified population of old age people. However, it is observed that elderly population living in nursing homes is experiencing several physical and psychological problems among which depression was significant. Mounting depression rates among old age people result in decrease life satisfaction and deterioration of their medical conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of implementing Nightingale’s theory into practice in order to decrease depression rate among elderly population at nursing homes. A pilot project was designed that included sample of twelve elderly male clients’ age lying between 60 to 80 and were resident of a senior citizen home, Karachi. The data was collected via pre and post intervention direct observations, individualized interview with feedbacks and completion of geriatric depression scale. The data was interpreted by applying t test for two dependent samples (alpha=0.05). The findings revealed that practical implementation of Nightingale’s theory aides in preventing and declining depression rates among old age people. The implementation focused on all 13 canons proposed by nightingale that included physical, psychological and environmental interventions. It is recommended that proper training related to Geriatric health needs should be provided to the nursing home’s staffs. In addition to it, interventions based on Nightingale’s principle should be planned and initiated in order to prevent and reduce depression cases and promote healthy aging among elderly population. Furthermore, it is highly suggested that further researches should be conducted on application of nursing theories in geriatric population.

Keywords: Elderly Population, Depression rate, Nightingale's theory, Healthy aging

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

A pilot project to analyze the application of nightingale’s theory in declining depression in elders

Auditorium Pond Side

It is anticipated that humans are increasing their life expectancy many fold that would result in amplified population of old age people. However, it is observed that elderly population living in nursing homes is experiencing several physical and psychological problems among which depression was significant. Mounting depression rates among old age people result in decrease life satisfaction and deterioration of their medical conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of implementing Nightingale’s theory into practice in order to decrease depression rate among elderly population at nursing homes. A pilot project was designed that included sample of twelve elderly male clients’ age lying between 60 to 80 and were resident of a senior citizen home, Karachi. The data was collected via pre and post intervention direct observations, individualized interview with feedbacks and completion of geriatric depression scale. The data was interpreted by applying t test for two dependent samples (alpha=0.05). The findings revealed that practical implementation of Nightingale’s theory aides in preventing and declining depression rates among old age people. The implementation focused on all 13 canons proposed by nightingale that included physical, psychological and environmental interventions. It is recommended that proper training related to Geriatric health needs should be provided to the nursing home’s staffs. In addition to it, interventions based on Nightingale’s principle should be planned and initiated in order to prevent and reduce depression cases and promote healthy aging among elderly population. Furthermore, it is highly suggested that further researches should be conducted on application of nursing theories in geriatric population.

Keywords: Elderly Population, Depression rate, Nightingale's theory, Healthy aging