Event Title

Beyond biochemical medicine: analyzing the psychosocial and psychological correlates of patient post-breast cancer treatments

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Background & Objectives: Lengacher, Bennett, Gonzalez, Gilvary, Cox, Cantor, Jacobsen, Yang, & Djeu, (2008) mentioned that cancer has affected 214,640 women in the United States and unfortunately 40,970 will die from this disease.

Purpose: To scrutinize the effect of breast cancer on the patient and their family and correlate it with contemporary literature. Methods: Systemic review of literature from 11 research articles from 1999 to 2011 was conducted through electronic medium by using JPMA, SAGE and Google search engines. Results: The patient showed psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, chronic sorrow, feelings of sadness, anger, confusion, fatigue related to surgery, helplessness and hopelessness, this is also evident in a study where 85% of breast cancer population, showed similar symptoms (Kim et al., 2010). Compas & Luecken (2002) revealed that psychological distress and elevated negative emotions are allied with breast cancer. Kim et al. (2010), Armento & Hopko (2009) and Al-Azri et al. (2009) listed supportive psychotherapy, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, problem-solving and social skills training as certain psychosocial interventions. It has been suggested by Lee at al. (2011) and Harding & Higginson (2003) that it is often imprecise that who the patient is. However, to place the caregivers’ view upfront brings about challenges in palliative settings.

Conclusion: In order to alleviate emotional distress and to amplify coping mechanisms, sessions of problem solving therapy is empirically recommended to accommodate the needs. As oncology nurses it is further recommended to counsel women with breast cancer as it would persuade them to verbalize and reflect their feelings pertaining to their experiences.

Keywords: psychological distress, Palliative therapies, Caregivers, Coping mechanisms

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Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

Beyond biochemical medicine: analyzing the psychosocial and psychological correlates of patient post-breast cancer treatments

Auditorium Pond Side

Background & Objectives: Lengacher, Bennett, Gonzalez, Gilvary, Cox, Cantor, Jacobsen, Yang, & Djeu, (2008) mentioned that cancer has affected 214,640 women in the United States and unfortunately 40,970 will die from this disease.

Purpose: To scrutinize the effect of breast cancer on the patient and their family and correlate it with contemporary literature. Methods: Systemic review of literature from 11 research articles from 1999 to 2011 was conducted through electronic medium by using JPMA, SAGE and Google search engines. Results: The patient showed psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, chronic sorrow, feelings of sadness, anger, confusion, fatigue related to surgery, helplessness and hopelessness, this is also evident in a study where 85% of breast cancer population, showed similar symptoms (Kim et al., 2010). Compas & Luecken (2002) revealed that psychological distress and elevated negative emotions are allied with breast cancer. Kim et al. (2010), Armento & Hopko (2009) and Al-Azri et al. (2009) listed supportive psychotherapy, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, problem-solving and social skills training as certain psychosocial interventions. It has been suggested by Lee at al. (2011) and Harding & Higginson (2003) that it is often imprecise that who the patient is. However, to place the caregivers’ view upfront brings about challenges in palliative settings.

Conclusion: In order to alleviate emotional distress and to amplify coping mechanisms, sessions of problem solving therapy is empirically recommended to accommodate the needs. As oncology nurses it is further recommended to counsel women with breast cancer as it would persuade them to verbalize and reflect their feelings pertaining to their experiences.

Keywords: psychological distress, Palliative therapies, Caregivers, Coping mechanisms