Event Title

Vitamin B 12 and folate deficiency status in a strict lacto-vegetarian population of Tharparkar

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Vitamin B12 and folate are essential for maturation of the red blood cells. B12 is only found in animal products while folate is abundant in plants. Strict lacto vegetarians are at high risk to develop vitamin B12 deficiency.

After an ethical approval of Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), we carried a randomized, cross sectional, descriptive and analytic study at a Tharparkar village to observe the prevalence and subsequent hematological parameters due to deficiencies of these vitamins in 200 subjects (100 strict lacto-vegetarians, compared with 100 non-vegetarians).

After a physical examination the blood samples were collected and sent to DUHS lab for serum B12 and folate levels and complete blood counts. The data were analyzed descriptively and statistically by SPSS 17 to calculate the Odds Ratios and p-Values.

The mean age of strict-vegetarian group was 30.5 years (± 8.3) and non-vegetarian as 30.1 years (± 9.2). Male to female ratio was 3.4:1.0

Vit-B12 deficiency was found in 83% strict-vegetarian and in 66% of non-vegetarian group, low folate 7% in vegetarian versus 23% non-vegetarians and anemia in 36% vegetarians versus only 20% in non vegetarian group. Definite high MCV was found in 30% vegetarians and 26% in non vegetarians. Thrombocytopenia and leucopenia were unremarkable.

It is concluded that vitamin B12 deficiency is predominantly found in the strict-vegetarians who also displayed alarming levels to produce neuropathy. The levels of folate were normal in the studied groups. Vitamin B12 supplementation is recommended in the high risk areas of Tharparkar.

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Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

Vitamin B 12 and folate deficiency status in a strict lacto-vegetarian population of Tharparkar

Auditorium Pond Side

Vitamin B12 and folate are essential for maturation of the red blood cells. B12 is only found in animal products while folate is abundant in plants. Strict lacto vegetarians are at high risk to develop vitamin B12 deficiency.

After an ethical approval of Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), we carried a randomized, cross sectional, descriptive and analytic study at a Tharparkar village to observe the prevalence and subsequent hematological parameters due to deficiencies of these vitamins in 200 subjects (100 strict lacto-vegetarians, compared with 100 non-vegetarians).

After a physical examination the blood samples were collected and sent to DUHS lab for serum B12 and folate levels and complete blood counts. The data were analyzed descriptively and statistically by SPSS 17 to calculate the Odds Ratios and p-Values.

The mean age of strict-vegetarian group was 30.5 years (± 8.3) and non-vegetarian as 30.1 years (± 9.2). Male to female ratio was 3.4:1.0

Vit-B12 deficiency was found in 83% strict-vegetarian and in 66% of non-vegetarian group, low folate 7% in vegetarian versus 23% non-vegetarians and anemia in 36% vegetarians versus only 20% in non vegetarian group. Definite high MCV was found in 30% vegetarians and 26% in non vegetarians. Thrombocytopenia and leucopenia were unremarkable.

It is concluded that vitamin B12 deficiency is predominantly found in the strict-vegetarians who also displayed alarming levels to produce neuropathy. The levels of folate were normal in the studied groups. Vitamin B12 supplementation is recommended in the high risk areas of Tharparkar.