Event Title

Stroke and caregivers burden

Presenter Information

Ashraf Vallyani, Aga Khan University

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Introduction: Stroke is the third leading cause of deaths (2) and adult disability (3) in the United States. After initial hospitalization and stroke rehabilitation, 80% of stroke survivors return to the community, relying on their family members support for daily living. Stroke caregivers have to deal with not only stroke patient’s difficulties in mobility, self-care, and communication, but also their cognitive impairment, depression, and personality changes (1).

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors that cause stress to stoke patient’s caregivers.

Methodology: We did an extensive literature review of the published studies. We chose articles published in indexed journals in last 20 years. Second, the search strategy excluded articles that focused on more generalized chronic disease caregiving rather than stroke-specific studies.

Results: Seven studies provided estimates of the prevalence of depression among stroke caregivers. These estimates ranged from as low as 34% to as high as 52% (1). Stroke survivor function was a significant predictor of stress for both survivors and caregivers (3). Partners of stroke patients perceived most caregiving burden in terms of “the consequences of involvement in care for the personal life of the caregiver” and more specifically in terms of feelings of heavy responsibility, uncertainty about patient’s care needs, constant worries, restraints in social life, and feelings that patients rely on only their care (2). Some other factors that provoked stress among care givers were spousal caregivers had to learn new skills over a relatively short period of time and feelings of insecurity in one’s ability to take on the caregiving role (3).

Conclusion: In summary, the literature consistently documented high rates of depression in stroke caregivers. Sharing responsibilities, helping to clarify the patients’ needs, and getting occasional relief of caregiving may be important in the support of caregivers.

Keywords: Stroke, caregiver, burdens, Stressors

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Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

Stroke and caregivers burden

Auditorium Pond Side

Introduction: Stroke is the third leading cause of deaths (2) and adult disability (3) in the United States. After initial hospitalization and stroke rehabilitation, 80% of stroke survivors return to the community, relying on their family members support for daily living. Stroke caregivers have to deal with not only stroke patient’s difficulties in mobility, self-care, and communication, but also their cognitive impairment, depression, and personality changes (1).

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors that cause stress to stoke patient’s caregivers.

Methodology: We did an extensive literature review of the published studies. We chose articles published in indexed journals in last 20 years. Second, the search strategy excluded articles that focused on more generalized chronic disease caregiving rather than stroke-specific studies.

Results: Seven studies provided estimates of the prevalence of depression among stroke caregivers. These estimates ranged from as low as 34% to as high as 52% (1). Stroke survivor function was a significant predictor of stress for both survivors and caregivers (3). Partners of stroke patients perceived most caregiving burden in terms of “the consequences of involvement in care for the personal life of the caregiver” and more specifically in terms of feelings of heavy responsibility, uncertainty about patient’s care needs, constant worries, restraints in social life, and feelings that patients rely on only their care (2). Some other factors that provoked stress among care givers were spousal caregivers had to learn new skills over a relatively short period of time and feelings of insecurity in one’s ability to take on the caregiving role (3).

Conclusion: In summary, the literature consistently documented high rates of depression in stroke caregivers. Sharing responsibilities, helping to clarify the patients’ needs, and getting occasional relief of caregiving may be important in the support of caregivers.

Keywords: Stroke, caregiver, burdens, Stressors