Event Title

Simulated patient’s feedback regarding final year end of term examination in medicine at Aga Khan University

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Introduction: Assessment is an integral part of any medical university. Traditionally, real patients were considered indispensable in medical training. Recent advances in health education coupled with overburdened health care systems have steered to the introduction of the relatively newer concept of “simulated or standardized patients” (SP). Simulated patients (SPs) are used worldwide and here at Aga Khan University as well. They are specifically trained according to examination need and used as simulators during end of term examinations here at Department of Medicine, AKU. It is imperative to understand the perspective of all stakeholders (360 evaluations).

Purpose: The purpose of our study was to understand the perspective of the SPs regarding the process of end of term examination (EOT) of final year students rotating in medicine here at Aga Khan University (AKU).

Method: A cross sectional survey was conducted amongst SPs participating in the final year EOT examination of the department of medicine at AKU from November 2012 to February 2013.

Results: The information was analyzed using SPSS. Descriptive statistics were inferred. n= 26 Majority of SPs were recruited by the Dept. for Educational Development (68.8%), work as SPs 1-3 times a month (65.2%), with an average session being 5-8hrs (56.3%). Most SPs (53.1%) were satisfied with the training provided to them.

Conclusion: Simulation has been proven to be a tremendous tool for healthcare educators, in that it allows students to achieve these goals without our patients being put at risk. The use of simulated patients for undergraduate assessment has become well established. The SPs were able to provide feedback to the organizers from a patient’s perspective immediately after a simulated clinical encounter.

Limitation: The original instrument was translated into another language. It is reported that translating an instrument always involves the risk that the original idea expressed in an item may not be conveyed fully and accurately

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Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

Simulated patient’s feedback regarding final year end of term examination in medicine at Aga Khan University

Auditorium Pond Side

Introduction: Assessment is an integral part of any medical university. Traditionally, real patients were considered indispensable in medical training. Recent advances in health education coupled with overburdened health care systems have steered to the introduction of the relatively newer concept of “simulated or standardized patients” (SP). Simulated patients (SPs) are used worldwide and here at Aga Khan University as well. They are specifically trained according to examination need and used as simulators during end of term examinations here at Department of Medicine, AKU. It is imperative to understand the perspective of all stakeholders (360 evaluations).

Purpose: The purpose of our study was to understand the perspective of the SPs regarding the process of end of term examination (EOT) of final year students rotating in medicine here at Aga Khan University (AKU).

Method: A cross sectional survey was conducted amongst SPs participating in the final year EOT examination of the department of medicine at AKU from November 2012 to February 2013.

Results: The information was analyzed using SPSS. Descriptive statistics were inferred. n= 26 Majority of SPs were recruited by the Dept. for Educational Development (68.8%), work as SPs 1-3 times a month (65.2%), with an average session being 5-8hrs (56.3%). Most SPs (53.1%) were satisfied with the training provided to them.

Conclusion: Simulation has been proven to be a tremendous tool for healthcare educators, in that it allows students to achieve these goals without our patients being put at risk. The use of simulated patients for undergraduate assessment has become well established. The SPs were able to provide feedback to the organizers from a patient’s perspective immediately after a simulated clinical encounter.

Limitation: The original instrument was translated into another language. It is reported that translating an instrument always involves the risk that the original idea expressed in an item may not be conveyed fully and accurately