Event Title

Seasonal variation in HBA1C level in type 2 diabetic patients in Pakistan

Location

Auditorium Pond Side

Start Date

26-2-2014 10:30 AM

Abstract

Introduction: HbA1c level is used to monitor glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. Numerous studies have shown a slightly higher HbA1c level in winter as compared to summer season. This has been attributed to reduced exercise and increased food intake in winter season. We therefore studied the seasonal variation of HbA1c level in the port city of Karachi, where there is minimal temperature variation.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the files of 245 patients, with type 2 diabetes duration of at least one year, who had regularly attended our out-patient diabetic clinic for at least two years from July 2010 to June 2012, and had an HbA1c level ≤7.5% at the start of the study period. Winter comprised of four months (November – February), and summer comprised of 8 months (March – October).

Results: A total of 1284 HbA1c levels were analyzed (mean 2.6 levels/patient/year). Mean (±SD) HbA1c level was 6.67 ± 0.56% in summer and 6.82 ± 0.71% in winter. The slightly higher HbA1c level in winter was not statistically significant. There was also a positive correlation between HbA1c levels in summer and winter. We even did not observe seasonal variation in HbA1c in a subset of 39 patients in whom no treatment change was needed over the study period.

Conclusion: We did not observe any significant seasonal variation in HbA1c level in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Karachi. This may be because there is minimal temperature variation between seasons in this region.

Keywords: Seasonal variation, HbA1c, Pakistan, Diabetic patients

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Feb 26th, 10:30 AM

Seasonal variation in HBA1C level in type 2 diabetic patients in Pakistan

Auditorium Pond Side

Introduction: HbA1c level is used to monitor glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. Numerous studies have shown a slightly higher HbA1c level in winter as compared to summer season. This has been attributed to reduced exercise and increased food intake in winter season. We therefore studied the seasonal variation of HbA1c level in the port city of Karachi, where there is minimal temperature variation.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the files of 245 patients, with type 2 diabetes duration of at least one year, who had regularly attended our out-patient diabetic clinic for at least two years from July 2010 to June 2012, and had an HbA1c level ≤7.5% at the start of the study period. Winter comprised of four months (November – February), and summer comprised of 8 months (March – October).

Results: A total of 1284 HbA1c levels were analyzed (mean 2.6 levels/patient/year). Mean (±SD) HbA1c level was 6.67 ± 0.56% in summer and 6.82 ± 0.71% in winter. The slightly higher HbA1c level in winter was not statistically significant. There was also a positive correlation between HbA1c levels in summer and winter. We even did not observe seasonal variation in HbA1c in a subset of 39 patients in whom no treatment change was needed over the study period.

Conclusion: We did not observe any significant seasonal variation in HbA1c level in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Karachi. This may be because there is minimal temperature variation between seasons in this region.

Keywords: Seasonal variation, HbA1c, Pakistan, Diabetic patients