Day 1 : Plenary I (Theme: Curriculum Enhancement and Innovation)

Event Title

Assuming patient safety in curriculum: a purpose not always evident

Location

AKU Auditorium

Start Date

26-1-2013 8:30 AM

Abstract

Patient safety is a term that now has universal prominence. Its very currency might lead us to feel that we understand its meaning. And if we are medical educators, we might also want to offer an educational solution, by adding this topic to the curriculum.

But would that be the most productive approach to the problem? Perhaps we should stand back before we hurtle forwards.

We might need to ask ourselves some challenging questions:

 Is this just another moral panic?

 Have we analysed the actual problem?

 Who are the players in patient safety?

 Have we taken context into account?

 Are we thinking of a course or a curriculum?

 Where is the evidence for such a curriculum?

 Can a curriculum alone do anything to enhance patient safety?

 If so, what is the purpose of the curriculum at each stage?

 Can medical education avoid a wider responsibility?

In answering those questions, we might conclude that if we are really serious about this issue, a new course on patient safety might not be sufficient. Medical education might also have to consider its wider responsibility towards the health care service as a whole.

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Jan 26th, 8:30 AM Jan 26th, 9:00 AM

Assuming patient safety in curriculum: a purpose not always evident

AKU Auditorium

Patient safety is a term that now has universal prominence. Its very currency might lead us to feel that we understand its meaning. And if we are medical educators, we might also want to offer an educational solution, by adding this topic to the curriculum.

But would that be the most productive approach to the problem? Perhaps we should stand back before we hurtle forwards.

We might need to ask ourselves some challenging questions:

 Is this just another moral panic?

 Have we analysed the actual problem?

 Who are the players in patient safety?

 Have we taken context into account?

 Are we thinking of a course or a curriculum?

 Where is the evidence for such a curriculum?

 Can a curriculum alone do anything to enhance patient safety?

 If so, what is the purpose of the curriculum at each stage?

 Can medical education avoid a wider responsibility?

In answering those questions, we might conclude that if we are really serious about this issue, a new course on patient safety might not be sufficient. Medical education might also have to consider its wider responsibility towards the health care service as a whole.