Day 1 : Oral Presentations (Theme: Patient Safety)

Event Title

Falls in elderly people: frequency, risk factors and risk assessment (FAR Study)

Location

Lecture Hall 2

Start Date

26-1-2013 3:40 PM

Abstract

Background: The number of people over the age of 60 is growing all over the world. With increasing age there is increased prevalence of visual, auditory and locomotive disability in the elderly. This may result in falls with injuries that may have serious consequences. The purpose of this study was to assess prevalence, risk assessment and risk factors associated with falls in elderly.

Methods: We conducted a research in Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Civil hospital, Jinnah Hospital and Karachi Institute of heart diseases. It was a cross sectional study with people living in Karachi as targeted population. Sample size was 150 individuals with age 60 years or above. An interviewer based questionnaire was administered. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 was used for data entry and analysis and Morse fall scale was used as a tool for risk assessment.

Results: From150 subjects, 96 (64%) gave a history of fall. Of these 42 (43.75%) were men and 54 (56.25%) were women while 33 (34.38%) of men and 44 (45.83%) of women had suffered injuries. Out of 96 participants, 38 (25%) subjects had fallen once and the rest 58 (60.4%) have fallen more than once. Risk factors associated with falls were medications, visual problems, gait abnormality, decrease physical activity, poor memory along with such intrinsic factors as slippery uneven surfaces in addition to age and gender.

Conclusions: It was identified that in sample of elderly individuals living in Karachi, prevalence of fall was 64%. The risk of fall tended to increase with age both in men and women. The findings of this study also stressed on various potential risk factors that were reversible. Early identification and management of these factors can help us in forming a fall prevention strategy.

Key words: Fall, elderly, prevalence, risk factors.

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Jan 26th, 3:40 PM Jan 26th, 3:50 PM

Falls in elderly people: frequency, risk factors and risk assessment (FAR Study)

Lecture Hall 2

Background: The number of people over the age of 60 is growing all over the world. With increasing age there is increased prevalence of visual, auditory and locomotive disability in the elderly. This may result in falls with injuries that may have serious consequences. The purpose of this study was to assess prevalence, risk assessment and risk factors associated with falls in elderly.

Methods: We conducted a research in Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Civil hospital, Jinnah Hospital and Karachi Institute of heart diseases. It was a cross sectional study with people living in Karachi as targeted population. Sample size was 150 individuals with age 60 years or above. An interviewer based questionnaire was administered. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 was used for data entry and analysis and Morse fall scale was used as a tool for risk assessment.

Results: From150 subjects, 96 (64%) gave a history of fall. Of these 42 (43.75%) were men and 54 (56.25%) were women while 33 (34.38%) of men and 44 (45.83%) of women had suffered injuries. Out of 96 participants, 38 (25%) subjects had fallen once and the rest 58 (60.4%) have fallen more than once. Risk factors associated with falls were medications, visual problems, gait abnormality, decrease physical activity, poor memory along with such intrinsic factors as slippery uneven surfaces in addition to age and gender.

Conclusions: It was identified that in sample of elderly individuals living in Karachi, prevalence of fall was 64%. The risk of fall tended to increase with age both in men and women. The findings of this study also stressed on various potential risk factors that were reversible. Early identification and management of these factors can help us in forming a fall prevention strategy.

Key words: Fall, elderly, prevalence, risk factors.